Integrating DSpace #or2017

Abstracts

Harvesting a Rich Crop: Research Publications and Cultural Collections in DSpace by Andrew Veal, Jane Miller

Currently DSpace v3.2, Repository Tools 1.7.1; upgrading to DSpace v5.6, RT 1.7.4

Wanted independent identity for each major collection area especially research publications and cultural collections; and to avoid weirdly mixed search results – so decided on a multi-tenancy approach. Four repositories on four domains. So could make customisations appropriate to specific collections.

  • research publications (via Elements and self-deposit for theses)
  • cultural collections (digitised; populated by OAI from archives collection and by bulk ingests via csv)
    • 77,000 records: pdf, images, architectural drawings, complete books, audio, video which requires specific display options. Collections based on ownership/subject. Files stored in external archive with metadata stored in DSpace and linking back to file; thumbnail generated on the file.
    • AusStage pilot project – relational index (contributors, productions) linked with digital assets (reviews, photos, video). So eg an event record has a “digital assets” link which brings back a search based on an id shared by related records.
    • Created custom “melbourne.sorting.key” field to enable different sort orders eg for maps where date of accession is irrelevant.
  • coursework resources (eg past exams; architectural drawings for a specific course) – no sitemap or OAI feed
  • admin collections (for ERA)

Couldn’t have done it without service provider (Atmire). Have done lots of business analysis to say what they want, for Atmire to set up. Downside of success is now stakeholders thinks it’s easy to fix anything!

Future:

  • develop gallery/lightbox interface
  • upgrade to 5.6; improve Google Scholar exposure
  • OAI harvesting of additional cultural collections
  • look at thesis preservation via Archivematica

DSpace in the centre by Peter Matthew Sutton-Long

Acknowledges Dr Agustina Martinez-Garcia who did much of the integrations work

[Follows up a bit on Arthur Smith’s presentation earlier so I won’t repeat too much background from there.] Before integration, had separate systems for OA publication and research dataset submissions, e-thesis submissions, Apollo repository, CRIS system for REF. This meant a lot of copy-pasting for admins from the manual submission form into repository submission for. And researchers had to enter data in CRIS (Elements) as well as submitting for repository! Also hard to report on eg author collaborations.

Approved June 2016 to integrate things to meet OA requirements, monitor compliance, help researchers share data, allow electronic deposit of theses, integrate systems with community-drive standards for the dissemination of research activities data.

Item deposited in Elements to repository via repository tools connector (though not all files are passed through). An e-theses system feeds into the repository too. Zendesk is also integrated – any deposit creates a Zendesk ticket, which can be used for communication with researchers.

Researchers can work with a single system. They can add grants and links to publications, link to their ORCID profiles (though they don’t seem to want to), obtain DOIs for every dataset and publication (so some people submit old data just to get this DOI; or submit data early, or submit a placeholder to get a DOI they can cite in their article).

Fewer systems for team to access and manage, enhanced internal workflows.

In future want to integrate VIVO.

DSpace for Cultural Heritage: adding support for images visualization,audio/video streaming and enhancing the data model by Andrea Bollini, Claudio Cortese, Giuseppe Digilio, Riccardo Fazio, Emilia Groppo, Susanna Mornati, Luigi Andrea Pascarelli, Matteo Perelli

DSpace-GLAM built by 4Science as an extension to DSpace, which started from discussions around challenges faced by digital humanities. Have to deal with different typologies, formats, structures, scales – and that’s only the first level of complexity. In addition, most data are created/collected by people (not instruments) so affected by personality, place, time, and may be fragmentary, biased. Has to be analysed with contextual information.

How to do this in a digital library management system? Need tools for:

  • modelling, visualising, analysing – quantitatively and qualitatively, and collaboratively
  • highlighting relationships between data
  • explaining interpretations
  • entering the workflow/network scholars are working in

DSpace-GLAM built on top of DSpace and DSpace-CRIS.

  • Flexible/extensible data model – persons, families, events, places, concepts. When you create a “creator-of” relationship, it automatically creates the inverse “created-by” relationship. Can be extended to work with special metadata standards. By setting these up you can see relationships between people, events, etc.
  • with various add-ons
    • IIIF compliant image viewer addon with presentation API, image API, search API, authentication API coming soon. Gives a “See online” option (instead of just downloading) which shows the image, or PDF, or… in an integrated Universal Viewer player: a smooth interaction with the image, alongside metadata about the object, and linking with the OCR/transcription (including right-to-left writing systems). Sharing and reusing with proper attribution.
    • Audio/video streaming with open source stack: transcoding, adaptive streaming, mpeg-dash standard. DASH standard protocol lets you share video along with access to server to provide zoom to make sure the content stays in the digital library so complete access to stats and ensure people see ownership.
    • Visualising and analysing datasets by integrating with CKAN to use grids, graphs, maps.

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